Posts Tagged ‘Episcopal Retirement Homes’

A Banner Year for Episcopal Retirement Homes

November 9, 2012

Over the years, we’ve worked hard at establishing a vision, a worth ethic, and way of embracing each and every resident like family, because they are. Proudly, we’ve achieved a level of recognition and reward that demonstrates our dedication and commitment to continuous improvement as demonstrated by our accreditation in 2012 by the prestigious internationally recognized Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) and the Continuing Care Accreditation Commission (CCAC).  Accreditation demonstrates a provider’s commitment to continuously improve service quality and to focus on the satisfaction of the persons served. Laura Lamb, Vice President of Residential Housing and Healthcare for Episcopal Retirement Homes, likens the accreditation to winning the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award on a corporate level, or getting a Consumer Reports’ “Best Buy” designation and a Good Housekeeping “Seal of Approval” on the consumer level.

Episcopal Retirement Homes is also a name that has earned consistently high resident satisfaction scores.  The Ohio Department of Aging 2011 nursing home resident satisfaction survey results came out this year and both Marjorie P. Lee’s Lee Gardens and Deupree House’s Deupree Cottages scored among the highest in the region with a 96.7% positive score on the key satisfaction measure: “Would you recommend this organization to others?” This rating was particularly meaningful as it was given by those who actually experienced the quality service and care offered by these skilled nursing communities. We’ve also been rewarded with industry-leading high Medicare ratings for our care centers.

In addition, Deupree Cottages was one of only six American nursing homes recognized in the newly published book Design for Aging: International Case Studies of Building and Program, for being among those with “excellent agedcare environments.” The book includes a total of 27 nursing homes worldwide and devotes an entire chapter to the Cottages and their innovative design, architectural challenges, and the quality care provided by their non-traditional Person- Centered Care approach.

This year, ERH was also recognized by city officials for its commitment to providing quality affordable living communities to lower income seniors by completing its two-year renovation of St. Paul Village in Madisonville. In addition, it will be closing on agreements to purchase four more communities by year end.

And because we know our organization is only as good as our staff, we’re happy to report we’ve earned  Top Workplace awards— our staff turnover is among the lowest in the country. And to everyone’s credit, we’ve been named among the best retirement communities in Cincinnati.

Doug Spitler, CEO, summed up the year this way:

“We are proud to be recognized on so many fronts for our good work and passion for improving the lives of older adults. It really demonstrates our commitment to staying on the forefront of our industry through continuous improvement and sound financial management.”

Everyone at Episcopal Retirement Homes welcomes the opportunity to serve, both residents and our communities, and we never forget how important it is to make living here, living well into the future.

June wedding memories blossom for residents at Deupree House

June 21, 2012

June Sciarra stands next to her wedding photo, part of a resident wedding photo display now hanging at Deupree House.

I couldn’t help noticing the smile that swept across June Sciarra’s face as she gazed upon her wedding photo among the many resident wedding photos now being displayed at Deupree House.

“Not a hard one to pick out,” Mrs. Sciarra said. “I’m the only one not wearing a wedding dress.”

Not that Mrs. Sciarra never had designs on wearing a beautiful dress. It was just that her then h

usband-to-be, Ivo, had joined the military during World War II and was shipping out to Europe within days of their decision to marry. There was no time for planning the whole kit and caboodle. She smiled again.

“So much to do, so little time,” she said.

So after a quick round of the required blood tests and her parents signing to allow the marriage (she was just 18 years old at the time), Mrs. Sciarra said they went to a pastor’s home for a short ceremony. Within three days, Ivo was off to war.

He didn’t return for two years.

“He was part of the Battle of the Bulge,” Mrs. Sciarra noted as she recalled the American offensive against Hitler in December 1944. “The whole war experience definitely left him with some very vivid memories, but this was especially moving for him.”

Mrs. Sciarra had known Ivo for awhile. She had met him at a party. She was in high school and he was in college at the time. “Probably not a big thing now, but then … oh, yes!” she said smiling.

After the war ended in Europe, Mrs. Sciarra said Ivo stayed to do war crimes work, helping to identifying the bodies of Jewish prisoners who had died in work camps. He went into the jewelry business when he came home.

“I went alone to the train station that day (that he came home,” Mrs. Sciarra said. “I worried I wouldn’t recognize him. He hadn’t sent any pictures while he was over there. But I knew him instantly when he got off the train.”

Looking over the photo array, Mrs. Sciarra said there is one thing that unites them all. “Such joy on our faces!” she said. “You can’t mistake that at all!”

What memories do your parents share that bring the same kind of joy?